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About parrying and damage reduction

#1
Hi everyone!


I was thinking about the % damage reduction when a character successfully parries a blow, and I would like to share my thoughts.
If my character successfully deflects a blow with his shield or weapon, he should avoid the damage because he has not been hit; he instead still receives part of the damage.
Now I understand that this can be too much in some situations: If a dragon hits me, or a giant smashes me with his club, a shield or a weapon won't probably be enough to absorb or deflect such powerful attacks; why then not use a flat damage reduction?
For example ( and this is a 100% hypothetical example, because I don't know how much damage you can actually do or receive at max on this shard) I have 50% probability to absorb 20 damage, what happen then? A very powerful blow will still inflicts some damage, but a low or medium damage will be perfectly deflected by the shield or weapon.

This can be implemented with armor too, where armor rating = some flat damage reduction instead of %, to create a better defense for a character that decides to invest in better protection. This can even create a more tactical approach regarding weapon choice: most of slashing and piercing damage are not very effective against a full plate (exception for very high damage that surpasses the flat damage reduction), impact weapons however are good against heavily armored opponents. The already present special attack from maces, that reduces the armor and improves the opponent's stamina loss, is perfect to represent this differentiation.
 
#2
I played a server where armor actually had a chance of parrying (like chain was 3% chance and plate was 5% per) on top of the Parrying skill. It was a cool concept, but unfortunately doesn't work in this 20-year-old system. The balance here is that you have a 50% chance to mitigate damage that would hit: at GM skill, you typically have a coin flip whether you get hit or not, and if you do, you have another coin flip (ENGAGING DEXXING MECHANICS) to mitigate that damage further. With shields it's 75% mitigation and with a two-handed weapon it's 50%. Now, armor here matters a lot more than it did on UO in this era, so that's a point for Team Dexxer. Another is that you can parry with two-handers, which was a big issue since parry dexxers often found themselves with a skill that was useless in many circumstances (needing a two-hander for example).

So stack the damage mitigation on top of armor and with the flexibility of a two-hander, and Parrying is actually quite useful here. With high AR you can tank a lot of damage in melee, plus 75% of the damage that does go through is now reduced further. On top of this, mages can cast with shields, as well, which is interesting (although not as potent as the typical tank mage in this era).
 
#3
Parallissi said:
Hi everyone!


I was thinking about the % damage reduction when a character successfully parries a blow, and I would like to share my thoughts.
If my character successfully deflects a blow with his shield or weapon, he should avoid the damage because he has not been hit; he instead still receives part of the damage.
Now I understand that this can be too much in some situations: If a dragon hits me, or a giant smashes me with his club, a shield or a weapon won't probably be enough to absorb or deflect such powerful attacks; why then not use a flat damage reduction?
For example ( and this is a 100% hypothetical example, because I don't know how much damage you can actually do or receive at max on this shard) I have 50% probability to absorb 20 damage, what happen then? A very powerful blow will still inflicts some damage, but a low or medium damage will be perfectly deflected by the shield or weapon.

This can be implemented with armor too, where armor rating = some flat damage reduction instead of %, to create a better defense for a character that decides to invest in better protection. This can even create a more tactical approach regarding weapon choice: most of slashing and piercing damage are not very effective against a full plate (exception for very high damage that surpasses the flat damage reduction), impact weapons however are good against heavily armored opponents. The already present special attack from maces, that reduces the armor and improves the opponent's stamina loss, is perfect to represent this differentiation.
This doesn't sound terrible to me.